Posted: 4 June 2015
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Wonder wall
Wonder wall

Vertical garden makes for a very environmentally-friendly car park at National Grid.

The wall is made up of more than 97,000 individual plants from over 25 different species.

"Feedback from staff and local community leaders has all been positive."

Simon Carter, Head of Corporate Property.

Europe’s largest ‘green wall’ is now up and growing in the new car park at National Grid House in Warwick.

A green wall is a vertical garden that is pre-planted in trays and attached to a building’s walls. Multi-storey car parks are rarely beautiful to look at, but Warwick’s three-storey structure is swathed in greenery that not only softens the building’s structure but increases biodiversity and makes for environmental best practice.

Green walls absorb and filter rainwater, remove pollutants in that water and, as the plants grow, improve their surrounding atmosphere by absorbing carbon dioxide, releasing oxygen and increase bug life.

At 1,042m², the Warwick example can hardly be missed. More than 97,000 individual plants from over 25 different species are anchored in soil within the wall’s panels, with each species blooming throughout the year to provide constantly-changing visual interest.

“If you’re going to have a green wall, you might as well make it the biggest one!” said Head of Corporate Property Simon Carter. “Environmental consultancy One World developed it for us. The plants have been grown specially and woven in a pattern to enable them to live and breathe better. Feedback from staff and local community leaders has all been positive.”

  • Paul Middleton

    Just came across your Connecting newsletter, following a LinkedIn item on Pulse of the nation,

    very Impressive!

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