Posted: 24 April 2015
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Current affairs

Companies across the UK are switching on to the innovative Demand Side Balancing Reserve (DSBR) service, which will see National Grid pay companies to use less energy at peak times. If called upon, firms signing up for the scheme will reduce their power demand or switch to their own generators between 4pm and 8pm on weekday evenings between November and February.

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Current affairs

Current affairs

"We are well aware of the National Grid DSBR initiative, and as a responsible energy consumer, we thought it was something we should get involved with."

Ben Burggraaf, Welsh Water’s Energy Operations Manager.

Insight:

Dwr Cymru Welsh Water (DCWW) came up with the idea of turning down or turning off air blowers, which account for up to 40 per cent of the total power used at waste water treatment plants.

Source: Dwr Cymru Welsh Water.

Dwr Cymru Welsh Water (DCWW) uses large amounts of energy to deliver water, sewerage and trade effluent services to homes and businesses in Wales and parts of Herefordshire.

Ben Burggraaf, Welsh Water’s Energy Operations Manager, said: “We are well aware of the National Grid DSBR initiative, and as a responsible energy consumer, we thought it was something we should get involved with. We have regular energy audits to make sure energy costs are controlled and as part of this we identified a process that might be used as part of the DSBR scheme.”

DCWW came up with the simple idea that if it was called upon it could turn down or turn off air blowers at several waste treatment plants. The blowers pump oxygen into tanks to help break down bacteria during the treatment of sewerage. Up to 40 per cent of the total power used at a waste water treatment plant is down to the air blowers.

Ben said: “At some of the plants we can turn the blowers down, at others we can isolate the blowers, and perhaps just leave one of them running, whilst maintaining regulatory compliance.”

And Ben was quick to urge others to join the scheme. He said: “The tendering process to apply to take part in the DSBR project had been simple and straightforward. We’d recommend any company which has the capability to temporarily reduce electricity demand to get involved in the scheme. National Grid have been great to work with – and this really is a win-win situation.

“If and when DSBR kicks in, we’ll be reducing our energy usage at peak times, and being rewarded for it, while National Grid is able to control its supply and demand while creating exciting partnerships with innovative and forward thinking operations like Dŵr Cymru Welsh Water.”

Read more:

A data-driven revolution is taking place in the energy market. Companies across the UK are switching to the innovative Demand Side Balancing Reserve (DSBR) service, where National Grid pays businesses to use less energy at peak times. Meet Limejump, pioneers in this dynamic new marketplace.

David Preston, National Grid’s DSBR Account Manager, explains why an innovative new partnership with big electricity users is an important part of the company’s toolkit.

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